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for Sleep-Care Professionals

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sleep and sleep technology. Developed by leading experts in the field, all educational content is
delivered on-demand to your desktop or mobile device.

Recommended for You

  • Includes Credits

    This webinar will provide an overview of sleep health through the lens of behavioral sleep medicine - addressing the fundamental functions of sleep, sleep disorders, and treating insomnia and CPAP non-adherence using evidence-based methodologies.

    This webinar will provide an overview of sleep health through the lens of behavioral sleep medicine - addressing the fundamental functions of sleep, sleep disorders, and treating insomnia and CPAP non-adherence using evidence-based methodologies. 

    Objectives:

    1. Provide an overview of normal human sleep functioning

    2. Identify and assess common sleep disorders

    3. Fundamentals of behavioral interventions for insomnia and CPAP adherence. 

    Natalia S. David, PsyD, DBSM

    Director of Training, DrLullaby.com

    Continuing Education:
    • 1 AAST CEC after passing a short knowledge assessment in the AAST Learning Center
    Access:
    • Free with AAST Membership
    • $30 for Non-Members
  • Includes Credits

    A2Zzz Q3 2023/ Volume 32/ Number 3

    The 2023 Q3 issue of A2Zzz is here! This issue's cover story offers advice for sleep-care professionals treating sleep problems in patients with long COVID. 

    Explore additional articles, including:

    • The Impact of Sound on Sleep
    • Sleep Hygiene: Practicing What You Preach 
    • The Impact of Halloween on Sleep Hygiene

    Updates to Claiming CECs From A2Zzz

    AAST members looking to claim their free AAST continuing education credits (CECs) from reading the latest issue of A2Zzz will now need to complete a knowledge assessment in the Learning Center. Upon completion of the knowledge assessment, AAST members will be awarded their two free AAST CECs. For additional information on this change, please view the instructions for earning credits from A2Zzz.

  • Includes Credits

    A variety of cases are used to review CPAP titration for OSA, beginning with patient interaction, mask fitting, and establishing a relationship for collection of outcomes. A simple flow chart for titration is presented and complexities are explored. Rules for identifying respiratory events and using events to determine PAP pressure increases are listed. The perils of over-titration are assessed and rules for down-titration are discussed. What does the technologist add to the titration process? A comparison of human and auto-titration methodologies provides the answer.

    Description: A variety of cases are used to review CPAP titration for OSA, beginning with patient interaction, mask fitting, and establishing a relationship for collection of outcomes. A simple flow chart for titration is presented and complexities are explored. Rules for identifying respiratory events and using events to determine PAP pressure increases are listed. The perils of over-titration are assessed and rules for down-titration are discussed. What does the technologist add to the titration process? A comparison of human and auto-titration methodologies provides the answer.

    Presenter: Richard S. Rosenberg, PhD

    Recorded: 7/12/2017

    CEC Credit(s): 1.0

    Target Audience: Sleep technologists seeking a background in PAP titration for obstructive sleep apnea.

    Length: 45 minutes

  • Includes Credits

    Panel of Senior Sleep Technologists sharing their experiences and lessons that have helped build their successful careers in the sleep center, sleep industry and sleep education.

    A panel of senior sleep technologists will be sharing their experiences and lessons learned that have helped build their successful careers in the sleep center, and sleep industry. 

    Objectives:
    1.  Provide insight on what skillsets helped prepare for their current roles
    2.  Understand different roles in the sleep field
    3.  Discuss training not just for new employees, but ongoing to promote educational growth and promote career opportunities 

    Speakers: 

    •  Sarah Brennecka, BA, RPSGT,  AAST Education Advisory Committee Chair 
    •  Bryan Beaudette, RPSGT, CCSH 
    •  Tessa Klucznyk, RST, RPSGT 
    •  Andrea Ramberg, RPSGT, CCSH

    Continuing Education:
    1 AAST CEC after passing a short knowledge assessment in the AAST Learning Center
    Access:
    Free with AAST Membership
    $30 for Non-Members


  • Includes Credits

    A2Zzz Q4 2023/ Volume 32/ Number 4

    The 2023 Q4 issue of A2Zzz is here! The use of the Internet of things (IoT) in the sleep field is showing promise in improving the diagnosis and management of sleep disorders, primarily obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). But are the drawbacks of IoT enough to prevent it from being fully utilized by sleep professionals?  

    Explore additional articles, including:

    • Revenge Bedtime Procrastination
    • SPONSORED: Is the Apnea-hypopnea Index the Best Metric for Evaluating Obstructive Sleep Apnea
    •  Sleep Scoring Among Different Types of Scorers: Thoughts on Getting to 100% Agreement

    Updates to Claiming CECs From A2Zzz

    AAST members looking to claim their free AAST continuing education credits (CECs) from reading the latest issue of A2Zzz will now need to complete a knowledge assessment in the Learning Center. Upon completion of the knowledge assessment, AAST members will be awarded their two free AAST CECs. For additional information on this change, please view the instructions for earning credits from A2Zzz.

  • Includes Credits

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) in children effects of 2-3% of all children, however in light of the rising prevalence of childhood obesity, the estimated prevalence has increased to 6-10% of all children. While the first line of therapy for Pediatric OSA in children consists of upper airway surgery via surgical removal off the adenoids and tonsils, it has become increasingly clear that surgery efficacy is limited in older and//or obese children. As a result, alternative therapies, including positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy has become mainstay for a lot of children. The application of PAP devices in children is unique and requires further attention to ensure that PAP therapy is successful.

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) in children effects of 2-3% of all children, however in light of the rising prevalence of childhood obesity, the estimated prevalence has increased to 6-10% of all children. While the first line of therapy for Pediatric OSA in children consists of upper airway surgery via surgical removal off the adenoids and tonsils, it has become increasingly clear that surgery efficacy is limited in older and//or obese children. As a result, alternative therapies, including positive airway pressure  (PAP) therapy has become mainstay for a lot of children. The application of PAP devices in children is unique and requires further attention to ensure that PAP therapy is successful.

    Objectives:
    1. Provide an overview of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in children
    2. Distinguish indications for Positive Airway Pressure (PAP) therapy in children
    3. Discuss obstacles of PAP adherence in  children
    4. Share real world data of PAP adherence in children
    Rakesh Bhattacharjee, MD, FRCPC, DABP(SM), CBSM, DBSM, FAASM

    Director of Sleep Medicine, Rady Children’s Hospital

    Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, UCSD

    Continuing Education:
    • 1 AAST CEC after passing a short knowledge assessment in the AAST Learning Center
    Access:
    • Free with AAST Membership
    • $30 for Non-Members
  • Includes Credits

    People living within “the spectrum” of autism are known to struggle with sleep. Chiefly it’s insomnia, but circadian rhythm disorders, movement disorders of sleep, parasomnias, and other sleep issues are also common in both children and adults who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD). What is it about neurodivergence that leads to sleep problems? Or is it the other way around? YAMADA et al tries to dig more deeply to answer the question, looking more closely at two key theories about ASD which may reveal sleep as a kind of missing link that needs more control in future research. This month’s journal club seeks to demystify the puzzle of autism. We’ll shine a spotlight on sleep disorders that frequently occur in this patient population, then review YAMADA et al’s findings. Finally, sleep technologists will take a look at some strategies into best care practices and tools to inform how we work with patients, both pediatric and adult, who live on the spectrum.

    Description: People living within “the spectrum” of autism are known to struggle with sleep. Chiefly it’s insomnia, but circadian rhythm disorders, movement disorders of sleep, parasomnias, and other sleep issues are also common in both children and adults who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD). What is it about neurodivergence that leads to sleep problems? Or is it the other way around? YAMADA et al tries to dig more deeply to answer the question, looking more closely at two key theories about ASD which may reveal sleep as a kind of missing link that needs more control in future research. This month’s journal club seeks to demystify the puzzle of autism. We’ll shine a spotlight on sleep disorders that frequently occur in this patient population, then review YAMADA et al’s findings. Finally, sleep technologists will take a look at some strategies into best care practices and tools to inform how we work with patients, both pediatric and adult, who live on the spectrum.

    Recorded: 6/26/2023

    CEC Credit(s): 1.0

    Target Audience: Sleep technologists

    Length: 1-hour

  • Includes Credits

    This pre-recorded web course discusses Central Sleep Apnea as well as the clinical evidence for phrenic nerve stimulation. This content is provided by Respicardia.

    This content is provided by Zoll/Respicardia.

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    Join us for a pre-recorded web course discussing Central Sleep Apnea as well as the clinical evidence for phrenic nerve stimulation.
    Topics include:

    • CSA pathophysiology and prevalence
    • How phrenic nerve stimulation therapy works in stabilizing breathing
    • Appropriate patients for phrenic nerve stimulation
    • Clinical results at 6, 12 and 18 months

    Presenters:

    Dr. Alan Schwartz

    • Professor of Medicine, ret. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine)
    • Clinical Associate Professor (University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine)
    • Profesor Extraordinario Visitante (Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima PERU)
    • Former medical director of the Johns Hopkins Sleep Disorders Center and co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Interdisciplinary Sleep Research and Education

    Dr. Robin Germany

    • Chief Medical Officer of Respicardia
    • Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Cardiovascular Disease, University of Oklahoma

    CEC Credit(s): 1.0

    Length: 52 minutes

  • Includes Credits

    With all the attention focusing on open source chatGPT these days (a popular interactive form of artificial intelligence, or AI), it seems necessary to discuss how aspects of AI—especially machine learning—impact our work in sleep technology. Specifically, new research has set out to find new, more efficient and accurate ways to identify patients with sleep apnea, determine its severity, and even decide on more personalized treatment pathways. This month’s Journal Club address AI and OSA by first examining just what machine learning is, then exploring the history of AI in the healthcare industry, looking even more closely at how it has served the field of sleep medicine and technology. Then we’ll review the Maniaci, et al (2023) study, which takes a closer look at how certain algorithms might help sleep medicine practitioners to better help identify and treat those patients with more severe sleep breathing disorders.

    Description: With all the attention focusing on open source chatGPT these days (a popular interactive form of artificial intelligence, or AI), it seems necessary to discuss how aspects of AI—especially machine learning—impact our work in sleep technology. Specifically, new research has set out to find new, more efficient and accurate ways to identify patients with sleep apnea, determine its severity, and even decide on more personalized treatment pathways. This month’s Journal Club address AI and OSA by first examining just what machine learning is, then exploring the history of AI in the healthcare industry, looking even more closely at how it has served the field of sleep medicine and technology. Then we’ll review the Maniaci, et al (2023) study, which takes a closer look at how certain algorithms might help sleep medicine practitioners to better help identify and treat those patients with more severe sleep breathing disorders.

    Recorded: 4/27/2023

    CEC Credit(s): 1.0

    Target Audience: Sleep technologists

    Length: 1-hour

  • Includes Credits

    In this course, learners will hear how to understand the tools, approaches, and clinical evidence for diagnosing and treating sleep apnea in cardiac patients. This content is provided by Respicardia.

    This content is provided by Zoll/Respicardia.

    image


    Overview: Understand the tools, approaches, and clinical evidence for diagnosing and treating sleep apnea in cardiac patients. This content is provided free of charge by Respicardia.

    Presenters:

    Kunal Agarwal, MD, FAAFP, FAASM, DipABOM
    Medical Director, TidalHealth Sleep Medicine, Seaford & Mellsboro, Delaware
    Objectives:

    Explore the evidence for sleep apnea screening in cardiology, with a focus on heart failure patients
    Understand the mechanisms and clinical consequences of untreated central sleep apnea
    Review the evidence for transvenous phrenic nerve stimulation (TPNS) to treat central sleep apnea

    CEC Credit(s): 1.0

    Length: 45 minutes